Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for July, 2008

KOMO 1000 News uses QuickTime to stream live online:

http://www.komonews.com/news/4531461.html?t=a&video=pop

 

It was pretty choppy on the computer that I viewed it on, and the page itself was not much to look at. However, I like that radio can be streamed. It is useful for lines of work that require people to be attuned to what the media is covering and what formats they use. It is also useful for leisure consumers, as it is a convenient addition to the existing ways to consume media. It is a convenience for the public to be able to access the broadcasts this way, and it allows KOMO to maintain a competitive edge.

 

KOMO TV also streams segments:

http://www.komonews.com/news/25962894.html?video=YHI&t=a

 

Read Full Post »

While reading chapters 7, 10, 11, and 13 of Media Economics, I found many similarities to other readings. Chapter 10 touches on pricing structures that are resonant of Anderson’s “Free! Why $0.00 is the Future of Business” discussions of the subscription model, and the concept of free and cross-subsidy methods used by Gillette. Chapter 11 covers advertising and cites that in some instances ads are “30-second dramas that out-entertain the regular programming” (p. 248). This relates to instances in The Long Tail: “Americans continued to watch more and more television, even as the ad load went up. Since they continued to give their attention despite getting less content, why not exploit that?” (p. 165).

(more…)

Read Full Post »

While looking for a Web site that integrates streaming media directly into its page, I recalled the University of Washington site that shows live footage from a Web cam pointed at Suzzallo Library. It is automatically updated every 5 minutes. I recall viewing the Web cam footage while in undergrad and the one draw back is that the campus isn’t quite as appealing to look at during the dark, rainy months.

(more…)

Read Full Post »

Guest speaker Mike Culver, Web Services Evangelist at Amazon, brought up some interesting discussion topics including outsourcing methods that have been introduced with the emergence of the Internet. Mechanical Turk allows anonymous people to do work for one another. The tasks are typically things that people can do, but computers cannot (like distinguish a chair from a table in a photograph). Other examples include AvWeb.com aiding in the search for Steve Fossett, Prosper.com for person to person lending, and CastingWords.com for human transcriptions from audio to text. (more…)

Read Full Post »

 

The San Jose Business Journal posted on Monday, July 14, 2008, that Netflix Inc. and Microsoft Corp. “unveiled a partnership to stream movies and television episodes using the Xbox 360 video game and entertainment system.”

 

“The companies said a growing library of more than 10,000 movies and TV episodes will be available from Netflix when it launches on Xbox Live in late fall, with more choices added over time.

 

Netflix said the move ‘represents an important step forward in making instantly streaming movies on the TV more broadly available to our members.’”

  (more…)

Read Full Post »

T.A. McCann was an informative speaker – particularly regarding the online content he covered.  I was able to usurp some of his attention during the Q &A session and learn about his start-ups, competition factors, and protocol for businesses “stealing” ideas. It was all very interesting. It is clear that he is a salesman, and proficient in selling himself and his ideas – and in being a winner.

Web 2.0 was architected for user participation and most sites haven’t taken advantage of this yet. In the future, the Web will move toward an even more active audience of “participants” rather than “users.” People who participate do so for emotional (personal & peer) and/or financial rewards (direct or indirect). (more…)

Read Full Post »

Three discussion questions regarding Chris Anderson’s The Long Tail:

  1. Page 186 addresses the decline of newspapers and the prevalence of blogs. Compared to newspapers, blogs have “more checks and balances,” “specialize in particular topics,” and have “virtually no costs.” There is no mention of ethics in this section at all. What role to ethics play these days? Are ethics the final upper hand or distinction that trained journalists have over bloggers? (more…)

Read Full Post »

Older Posts »